Monday in a Picture – Half Dollar

Living in Swaziland has taught me many things, and reaffirmed others. One of the things that has been reaffirmed is the heavy influence of American culture on Swaziland. In particular, American hip hop culture influences many across the kingdom.

Some of my students want to know my personal familiarity and acquaintance with John Cena, Beyonce, and Rick Ross among others. I’ve helped friends in my community to get updated music from their favorite artists. 

Just outside of the Swazi metropolis known as Manzini, there is a town called Matsapha. While Matsapha is home to an array of businesses and restaurants, one business meshes American hip hop culture and Swazi cuisine. The eatery’s name is 50’s Kitchen. The restaurateur is definitely 50 Cents’ doppelganger. But he doesn’t rest on his resemblance to his famed American twin to garner business. The food is delicious and affordable. 

If you ever find yourself in Matsapha, or even Manzini, definitely stop by and enjoy the culinary delights. 

Be kind to yourself. 
Onward. 

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Monday in a Picture – Coming to America

Photo credit: U.S. embassy (Swaziland)

One of the things that I hear often around my community is a desire to go to the United States. Some people want to study in the U.S. Some want to travel and see the sights. 

In December, our country director sent all current Swaziland PCVs an email announcing recruitment for the Pan Africa Youth Leadership Program (PAYLP). The exchange program is sponsored and funded by the U.S. State Department, and coordinated locally through the American embassy and other partners. 

The school term had already finished, so I sent the message to a few teachers at my community high school to see if they wanted to nominate anyone. A teaching colleague wanted to nominate her son. He completed the application and motivation statements, and I submitted his application. 

In early February, we received notice that my teaching colleague’s son was one of five Swazi students accepted into the program and would be going to America in April. This started a busy month of obtaining passports and other documents. Then, there was the visa application process (which reminded me of the extreme privilege that comes simply with being born in America). Finally, there was the pre-departure orientation at the U.S. embassy in Swaziland. The students were able to meet the rest of the cohort, attend visa interviews, and allay some fears and worries about the trip. 

There was a video conference with representatives from the State Department, other partners, and participants from all PAYLP countries (10 nations in total, including Swaziland). The students were all very excited. This month, their collective excitement becomes reality when they arrive in the United States. They will meet with various American officials, study at local universities, and have homestay experiences with American families. The only thing left to do is get on the plane. 

In the picture above, the Public Affairs Officer (middle) poses with the students and their adult mentor.

Be kind to yourself. 
Onward. 

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Sweet dreams – Harriet Tubman 20

Because I am posted in a country where I might contract malaria, I have been given an antimalarial medication called, “Mefloquine”. One of the side effects of this medication is lucid dreaming. The following is what I dreamt last night (as best I can remember). 


I was somewhere in the US. I had agreed to cut some guy’s hair. He was a friend of a friend. I wasn’t working. He said that he would give me ten dollars to cut his hair. He had a big day coming up. He was white. He had hairy feet. 

The next day comes, and I’m cutting his hair outside. I am paying meticulous attention to what I’m doing. I cut his hair and give him a fresh line up. For some reason, I ask him if he wants me to shave his feet. He says ‘no’. I say ‘okay’. I’m not really impressed with the job I’ve done. He likes it though.

He’s getting up to leave. And he says ‘oh, yeah. I need to pay you for this. He said how does forty bucks sound?’ I’m excited because I was only expecting ten. He pulls out a crisp twenty dollar bill. It’s a Harriet Tubman twenty dollar bill. Fresh and new. I am so excited, like ‘bruh where did you get this?’. He just smiles. Realizing that he only gave me twenty, he pulls out another twenty. It is fresh as well. But it has a woman named Dunn on it. She’s Loretta Dunn. She’s famous for something (I still don’t know what). I’m so happy that I don’t even want to spend it. I want to save it and frame it like my first dollar.