Photo Post: August 2016 (NSFW)

Warning: this post does contain one picture with nudity (bare breasts)

The cow chilling with the calf. Life in Nkamandzi is pretty good. 

Some extended family came over for the weekend. My bobhuti made swings for everyone to play on. 

After dinner, I wanted to capture the moment and the moon. Mostly, the moon. 

For host family appreciation day, some trainees donned traditional Swazi dress (lihiya and sidvasha). 

I haven’t encountered many training managers. But after being under the tutelage of Yemi, I can confidently say that she’s the best. 

My sikhoni, mzala (cousin), and me on host family appreciation day. Photo credit: Timmya D. 

Bhuti wami, make wami na mine. (My brother, my mother, and me). Host family appreciation day. Photo credit: Timmya D. 

One of the biggest traditions in the world, Umhlanga, celebrates the purity and chastity of young maidens. Also, called the Reed Dance, about 98000 young ladies and girls. 

When his majesty, King Mswati III arrives, he arrives! He attended Umhlanga also with dignitaries from Malawi, Mozambique, Angola, Tanzania and, Lesotho to name a few. 

Extended family comes to town. Of course, pictures are in order. 

Before the host family appreciation day festivities, Nate gets his lihiya (traditional Swazi top dress) on properly with the assistance of a host make. 

As we prepared to leave Nkamandzi, another volunteer’s family had some of us over for dinner. Here, Nathalie (left) cooks rice on the open fire with Akirah’s make. 

Be kind to yourself. 
Onward. 

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Photo Post: July 2016

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Three out of my four young bobhuti in my training host family. They wanted a picture. Wish granted.

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Half of our language class, with our thishela. It’s always the right time for a selfie.

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That’s me cutting the chicken’s neck while a thishela holds the chicken’s body. It’s a real farm to table experience. Photo credit – Timmya D.

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During a school visit, we were waiting on the teacher to show up. I entertained questions about life in America. Photo credit – Timmya D.

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Meet Deborah, right, and Lakia. These young ladies are in my cohort (G14). They graciously agreed to be subjects as I work on my photog skills.

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As a part of our training, we visited the sangoma, or traditional healer. He calls on the ancestors to heal folks of various ailments.

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We were privileged to journey to Milwane Game Reserve. A walk through the game park revealed stupendous sights.

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During our visit to the Matenga Cultural Village, Darah was invited up to join the dance. The cultural village educates people on Swazi culture and traditions.

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If you know me, you know I love bicycles. These bobhuti allowed me to ride their bike for a bit. No tires. No chain. No cog. No seat. No problem. Photo credit – Timmya D.

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Each one, teach one. Meaghan and Darah talk to some local children about gardening after our permagardening session.

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This is Letty. Her shirt caught my attention. I find out that a local guy makes them. I’m excited to buy local and support small business.

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At the end of a long day of a practicum, this permagarden is the result. Team work makes the dream work.

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After playing catch, they stopped for a picture. Lots of love captured here.

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I’m not sure who took this photo, but here are almost all of the currently serving volunteers (and trainees) at the Fourth of July celebration hosted by our country director. Peace Corps Swaziland!

Be kind to yourself.
Onward.